Archive for September, 2012

28
Sep

Introducing Dr. Rocks!

   Posted by: dsheret759    in Uncategorized

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our intrepid explorer Dr. Rocks will travel the globe and beyond in search of new wonders to share. Stay tuned for updates of his adventures from the Crystal Cathedral.

27
Sep

Gem of the day #3

   Posted by: dsheret759    in Uncategorized

Cerro del Mercado mine, Durango Mexico
Specimen size: 4×3.3×2 cm
Description: A 3.2×1.5 cm green-yellow crystal is intergrown with a breccia-matrix containing quartz, calcite, apatite fragments and pyroxene partly replaced by yellow nontronite. The transparent  crystal has a good lustre but also many internal fractures. It is mounted on a wooden base.


Can you name this gem?

27
Sep

Did you Know?

   Posted by: dsheret759    in Uncategorized

In Greece, people think if wine is poured into the cups made of amethyst, one does not get drunk after drinking that.

It is believed that a turquoise gifted to a friend or a lover turns his or her life into one of happiness and good luck.

In Germany, the garland of amber is hung around the necks of the infants, so that their teeth might come out without much trouble.

In Rome, a talisman having coral pieces is considered very auspicious to quell the bad spells of evil look. The Romans were in the habit of hanging chains made of ancient coral pieces from the cradle of the infants to protect them from evil effects.

It is said about turquoise, that when the stone changes its color into yellow, it actually signals bad times to the person who wears it.

26
Sep

Gemologist Ben Smith

   Posted by: dsheret759    in Uncategorized

Education is just one facet of Wilmington gemologist’s work

 

Gemologist Ben Smith uses a faceting machine to facet a smoky quartz at T.S. Brown’s in Wilmington on Jan. 13.

Buy Photo Photo by Matt Born

By Cece Nunn
Cece.Nunn@StarNewsOnline.com

Published: Saturday, February 12, 2011 at 12:30 a.m.

Last Modified: Friday, February 11, 2011 at 9:02 p.m.

Gems that twinkle in the cases of jewelry stores don’t start out as the sparkly pieces people wear.

Facts

Learn more

To find out more about gems, minerals and gemology, visit the website of the Southeastern Federation of Mineralogical Societies, www.amfed.org/sfms/

Shaping amethysts, rubies, emeralds and other natural beauties into creations that fit into pendants, rings, earrings, bracelets and more takes special skill and knowledge, the kind Wilmington resident Ben Smith has acquired over the years.

Born in South Carolina and a Port City resident for more than 60 years, Smith, 85, is a gemologist who earned the honor of being a Fellow of the Gemological Association of Great Britain in 1963. He demonstrates his skills of faceting gems Tuesdays and Thursdays at T.S. Brown Jewelry in the Cotton Exchange.

Facets are flat faces on geometric shapes, and faceting is the practice of grinding and polishing those faces. At T.S. Brown, Smith uses a faceting machine made at Fac-Ette Manufacturing Inc. in Leland and explains his craft to interested customers, visitors and school groups.

He’s also promoting gem education by donating parts of his gem and mineral collection to the Cape Fear Community College’s geology department.

“I realized we’re eventually going to a retirement home,” said Smith, referring to himself and his wife, Susan Smith. “We don’t have room for all this stuff. I wanted to put it where it would be used for educational purposes.”

For the rest of the story please go to:

http://www.starnewsonline.com/article/20110212/ARTICLES/110219894

26
Sep

Geological News 09/26/2012

   Posted by: dsheret759    in Uncategorized

 A large 457.7-gram specimen of breccia from the massive Popgai crater in northern Siberia. Note the variety of colors, sizes, shapes and textures within a single mass—the result of a major meteorite impact which threw millions of tons of rock into the air. As fragments fell back to earth, rocks from different strata were mixed together. Millions of years of heat and pressure compressed those assorted pieces into a solid mass known as an impact breccia. Photograph by Geoffrey Notkin © Aerolite Meteorites.

26
Sep

Dr. McKeithan Awarded Chief Status

   Posted by: dsheret759    in Uncategorized

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Melissa Singler,  member of the Waccamaw Souian Tribe and Dr Phillip Garwood present to Dr. McKeithan a hand beaded ceremonial feather endowing the tribal status of Chief to Dr. McKeithan.

26
Sep

Gem of the Day #2

   Posted by: dsheret759    in Uncategorized

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman  were in what country? It is the same country where you will find this sample.  A carbonate mineral, one of the two common, naturally occurring, crystal forms of calcium carbonate, CaCO3 (the other form being the mineral calcite). It is formed by biological and physical processes, including precipitation from marine and freshwater environments.

25
Sep

Waccamaw Siouan Tribe 42nd Annual Pow Wow

   Posted by: dsheret759    in Uncategorized

 

 

 

 

 

October 19-20th 2012

Waccamaw Siouan Tribal Grounds

7275 old Lake Rd. Bolton, NC

The Waccamaw Siouan Tribe, Inc., is a non-profit organization empowered to act on be-half of the Waccamaw Siouan Indian People. The Waccamaw Siouan Tribal Organization was founded in 1971 and incorporated with the state of North Carolina in 1972. It serves the health, education and economic needs of the Waccamaw Siouan Indians who number around two-thousand. Tribal policy is formed by the Tribal Council which consist of seven elected members who are drawn from the communities and serve on the council for a tenure of three years. The Tribal Council hires a staff to carry out the day-to-day operations of the association and to insure compliance with the goals and objectives of the Wac-camaw Siouan Tribe.

25
Sep

CFCC Geology Faculty and Staff

   Posted by: dsheret759    in Uncategorized

Dr. Phillp Garwood

Education
B.A., McMaster Univ. Canada
B.A., University of Toronto
M.A., Wesleyan Univ., Connecticut, 1976
Doctorate (undeclared), Edith Cowans Univ., Perth Australia 1978

Office: S 406
Telephone: (910) 431-1162
E-mail: pgarwood@cfcc.edu

Phil Garwood

Phil Garwood
Geology Instructor

Alvin L. Coleman

Education
B.S., State University of West Georgia
M.S., University of Tennessee – Knoxville

Office: S 406

Telephone: (910) 362-7365
E-mail: acoleman@cfcc.edu

Alvin Coleman

James Criswell

Education
B.S., Waynesburg University
B.S., Phoenix University
M.S., Wright State University

Office: NB 146
Telephone: (910) 362-7536
E-mail: jcriswell@cfcc.edu

James Criswell

Daniel Sheret

Lab Technician

Email: dsheret@cfcc.edu

Cell:910-431-1162

25
Sep

Geological news 9/26/2012

   Posted by: dsheret759    in Uncategorized

Press Release: Arctic sea ice reaches lowest extent for the year and the satellite record

arctic sea ice

Sea ice can take many forms, as seen in this image of Arctic sea ice from a recent Operation IceBridge aerial survey. Varying thicknesses of sea ice are shown here, from thin, nearly transparent layers to thicker, older sea ice covered with snow. —Credit: NASA
High-resolution image

The National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) is part of the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado Boulder. NSIDC scientists provide Arctic Sea Ice News & Analysis content, with partial support from NASA.

BOULDER, Colorado—Arctic sea ice cover likely melted to its minimum extent for the year on September 16, according to scientists at the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC). Sea ice extent fell to 3.41 million square kilometers (1.32 million square miles), now the lowest summer minimum extent in the satellite record.

“We are now in uncharted territory,” said NSIDC Director Mark Serreze. “While we’ve long known that as the planet warms up, changes would be seen first and be most pronounced in the Arctic, few of us were prepared for how rapidly the changes would actually occur.”

Arctic sea ice cover grows each winter as the sun sets for several months, and shrinks each summer as the sun rises higher in the northern sky. Each year, the Arctic sea ice reaches its minimum extent in September. This year’s minimum follows a record-breaking summer of low sea ice extents in the Arctic. Sea ice extent fell to 4.10 million square kilometers (1.58 million square miles) on August 26, breaking the lowest extent on record set on September 18, 2007 of 4.17 million square kilometers (1.61 million square miles). On September 4, it fell below 4.00 million square kilometers (1.54 million square miles), another first in the 33-year satellite record.

“The strong late season decline is indicative of how thin the ice cover is,” said NSIDC scientist Walt Meier. “Ice has to be quite thin to continue melting away as the sun goes down and fall approaches.”

NSIDC scientists have observed fundamental changes in the Arctic’s sea ice cover. The Arctic used to be dominated by multiyear ice, or ice that survived through several years. Lately, the Arctic is increasingly characterized by seasonal ice cover and large areas are now prone to completely melt away in summer.

“The later minimum date is somewhat surprising because we expected that the late melt in the Chukchi and East Siberian seas would result in cool surface waters that would quickly refreeze once the atmosphere cooled,” Meier said. “However, ice loss continued north of the Laptev Sea, opening up a gap in the ice cover that reduced extent.”

Arctic sea ice has long been recognized as a sensitive climate indicator. The region’s sea ice extent–defined by NSIDC as the total area covered by at least 15 percent of ice—varies from year to year because of changeable weather conditions. However, ice extent has shown a dramatic overall decline over the past thirty years. This year’s minimum will be nearly 50 percent lower than the 1979 to 2000 average.

NSIDC lead scientist Ted Scambos said that thinning ice, along with early loss of snow, are rapidly warming the Arctic. “But a wider impact may come from the increased heat and moisture the warmer Arctic is adding to the climate system,” he said. “This will gradually affect climate in the areas where we live,” he added. “We have a less polar pole—and so there will be more variations and extremes.”

NSIDC scientist Julienne Stroeve said, “Recent climate models suggest that ice-free conditions may happen before 2050, though the observed rate of decline remains faster than many of the models are able to capture.”

Serreze said, “While lots of people talk about opening of the Northwest Passage through the Canadian Arctic islands and the Northern Sea Route along the Russian coast, twenty years from now from now in August you might be able to take a ship right across the Arctic Ocean.”

For more details on the minimum ice extent, see the Arctic Sea Ice News and Analysis Web site. The site provides regular updates by NSIDC scientists on the condition of the Arctic sea ice.

Please note that this number is preliminary–changing weather conditions could still push the ice extent lower. During the first week of October, NSIDC will issue a full analysis of the possible causes behind this year’s ice conditions, including a discussion of how the summer’s low ice extent may affect the winter ice growth season ahead, and graphics comparing this year to the long-term record.

 

Information and graphics

For the scientific report and data images, please see NSIDC’s Arctic Sea Ice News and Analysis.

A news release by NASA is available at http://www.nasa.gov/topics/earth/features/2012-seaicemin.html

NASA’s image of the September 16 minimum may be downloaded here: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a000000/a003900/a003998/Minimum_SeaIce_Area_2012_09_16.1080.tif

 

Contact:

Natasha Vizcarra
National Snow and Ice Data Center
University of Colorado Boulder
(303) 492-1497
natasha.vizcarra@nsidc.org