Best Sellers moved to circulating collection

Lost December: A Novel by Richard Paul Evans   PS 3555 .V259 L68 2011 

From one of America’s most beloved storytellers comes his most spiritual book since The Christmas Box.“It has been said that sometimes the greatest hope in our lives is just a second chance to do what we should have done right in the first place. This is the story of my second chance.” —Prologue of Lost December
 
When Luke Crisp graduates from business school, his father, CEO and co-founder of Fortune 500 Crisp’s Copy Centers, is ready to share some good news: he wants to turn the family business over to his son. But Luke has other plans. Taking control of his trust fund, Luke leaves home to pursue a life of reckless indulgence.

But when his funds run out, so do his friends. Humbled, alone, and too ashamed to ask his father for help, Luke secretly takes a lowly job at one of his father’s copy centers. There he falls in love with a struggling single mother and begins to understand the greatest source of personal joy.

Lost December is Richard Paul Evans’s modernday holiday version of the biblical story of the prodigal son, a powerful tale of redemption, hope, and the true meaning of love.

The Alloy of Law: A Mistborn Novel by Brandon Sanderson                                       PS 3619 .A533 A79 2011

Three hundred years after the events of the Mistborn trilogy, Scadrial is now on the verge of modernity, with railroads to supplement the canals, electric lighting in the streets and the homes of the wealthy, and the first steel-framed skyscrapers racing for the clouds.
Kelsier, Vin, Elend, Sazed, Spook, and the rest are now part of history—or religion. Yet even as science and technology are reaching new heights, the old magics of Allomancy and Feruchemy continue to play a role in this reborn world. Out in the frontier lands known as the Roughs, they are crucial tools for the brave men and women attempting to establish order and justice.
One such is Waxillium Ladrian, a rare Twinborn, who can Push on metals with his Allomancy and use Feruchemy to become lighter or heavier at will.  After twenty years in the Roughs, Wax has been forced by family tragedy to return to the metropolis of Elendel. Now he must reluctantly put away his guns and assume the duties and dignity incumbent upon the head of a noble house. Or so he thinks, until he learns the hard way that the mansions and elegant tree-lined streets of the city can be even more dangerous than the dusty plains of the Roughs.

Best Sellers moved to circulating collection

Explosive Eighteen: A Stephanie Plum Novel by Janet Evanovich                              PS 3555 .V2126 E97 2011

Bounty hunter Stephanie Plum’s life is set to blow sky high when international murder hits dangerously close to home, in this dynamite novel by Janet Evanovich.
      Before Stephanie can even step foot off Flight 127 Hawaii to Newark, she’s knee deep in trouble. Her dream vacation turned into a nightmare, and she’s flying back to New Jersey solo. Worse still, her seatmate never returned to the plane after the L.A. layover. Now he’s dead, in a garbage can, waiting for curbside pickup. His killer could be anyone. And a ragtag collection of thugs and psychos, not to mention the FBI, are all looking for a photograph the dead man was supposed to be carrying.
     Only one other person has seen the missing photo—Stephanie Plum. Now she’s the target, and she doesn’t intend to end up in a garbage can. With the help of an FBI sketch artist Stephanie re-creates the person in the photo. Unfortunately the first sketch turns out to look like Tom Cruise, and the second sketch like Ashton Kutcher. Until Stephanie can improve her descriptive skills, she’ll need to watch her back.
     Over at the bail bonds agency things are going from bad to worse. The bonds bus serving as Vinnie’s temporary HQ goes up in smoke. Stephanie’s wheelman, Lula, falls in love with their largest skip yet. Lifetime arch nemesis Joyce Barnhardt moves into Stephanie’s apartment. And everyone wants to know what happened in Hawaii?
     Morelli, Trenton’s hottest cop, isn’t talking about Hawaii. Ranger, the man of mystery, isn’t talking about Hawaii.  And all Stephanie is willing to say about her Hawaiian vacation is . . . It’s complicated.

 

11/22/63: A Novel by Stephen King    PS 3561 .I483 A615 2011

On November 22, 1963, three shots rang out in Dallas, President Kennedy died, and the world changed. What if you could change it back? Stephen King’s heart-stoppingly dramatic new novel is about a man who travels back in time to prevent the JFK assassination—a thousand page tour de force.Following his massively successful novel Under the Dome, King sweeps readers back in time to another moment—a real life moment—when everything went wrong: the JFK assassination. And he introduces readers to a character who has the power to change the course of history.
Jake Epping is a thirty-five-year-old high school English teacher in Lisbon Falls, Maine, who makes extra money teaching adults in the GED program. He receives an essay from one of the students—a gruesome, harrowing first person story about the night 50 years ago when Harry Dunning’s father came home and killed his mother, his sister, and his brother with a hammer. Harry escaped with a smashed leg, as evidenced by his crooked walk.Not much later, Jake’s friend Al, who runs the local diner, divulges a secret: his storeroom is a portal to 1958. He enlists Jake on an insane—and insanely possible—mission to try to prevent the Kennedy assassination. So begins Jake’s new life as George Amberson and his new world of Elvis and JFK, of big American cars and sock hops, of a troubled loner named Lee Harvey Oswald and a beautiful high school librarian named Sadie Dunhill, who becomes the love of Jake’s life—a life that transgresses all the normal rules of time.A tribute to a simpler era and a devastating exercise in escalating suspense, 11/22/63 is Stephen King at his epic best.

 

A History of the World in 100 Objects  by Neil MacGregor    GN 740 .M16 2011

From the renowned director of the British Museum, a kaleidoscopic history of humanity told through things we have made.

When did people first start to wear jewelry or play music? When were cows domesticated and why do we feed their milk to our children? Where were the first cities and what made them succeed? Who invented math-or came up with money?

The history of humanity is a history of invention and innovation, as we have continually created new items to use, to admire, or to leave our mark on the world. In this original and thought-provoking book, Neil MacGregor, director of the British Museum, has selected one hundred man-made artifacts, each of which gives us an intimate glimpse of an unexpected turning point in human civilization. A History of the World in 100 Objects stretches back two million years and covers the globe. From the very first hand axe to the ubiquitous credit card, each item has a story to tell; together they relate the larger history of mankind-revealing who we are by looking at what we have made.

Handsomely designed, with more than 150 color photographs throughout the text, A History of the World in 100 Objects is a gorgeous reading book and makes a great gift for anyone interested in history.

 

Micro: A Novel by Michael CrichtonPS 3553 .R48 M53 2011

Three men are found dead in the locked second-floor office of a Honolulu building, with no sign of struggle except for the ultrafine, razor-sharp cuts covering their bodies. The only clue left behind is a tiny bladed robot, nearly invisible to the human eye.

In the lush forests of Oahu, groundbreaking technology has ushered in a revolutionary era of biological prospecting. Trillions of microorganisms, tens of thousands of bacteria species, are being discovered; they are feeding a search for priceless drugs and applications on a scale beyond anything previously imagined.

In Cambridge, Massachusetts, seven graduate students at the forefront of their fields are recruited by a pioneering microbiology start-up. Nanigen MicroTechnologies dispatches the group to a mysterious lab in Hawaii, where they are promised access to tools that will open a whole new scientific frontier.

But once in the Oahu rain forest, the scientists are thrust into a hostile wilderness that reveals profound and surprising dangers at every turn. Armed only with their knowledge of the natural world, they find themselves prey to a technology of radical and unbridled power. To survive, they must harness the inherent forces of nature itself.

An instant classic, Micro pits nature against technology in vintage Crichton fashion. Completed by visionary science writer Richard Preston, this boundary-pushing thriller melds scientific fact with pulse-pounding fiction to create yet another masterpiece of sophisticated, cutting-edge entertainment.

Out of Oz: The Final Volume in the Wicked Years  by Gregory Maguire                    PS 3563 .A3535 O98 2011

The stunning conclusion to the smash New York Timesbestselling series the Wicked Years.

Hailed as “bewitching,” “remarkable,” “extraordinary,” “engrossing,” “amazing,” and “delicious,” Gregory Maguire’s Wicked Years series—a sophisticated fantasy cycle inspired by the classic children’s novel The Wizard of Oz—became national bestsellers and the basis for a hit Tony-winning Broadway musical. Now, Maguire returns with the final installment in his transformative work, a thrilling and compulsively readable saga in which the fate of Oz is decided at last. . . .

Once peaceful and prosperous, the spectacular Land of Oz is knotted with social unrest: The Emerald City is mounting an invasion of Munchkinland, Glinda is under house arrest, and the Cowardly Lion is on the run from the law. And look who’s knocking at the door. It’s none other than Dorothy. Yes. That Dorothy.

Yet amidst all this chaos, Elphaba’s granddaughter, the tiny green baby born at the close of Son of a Witch, has come of age. Now it is up to Rain to take up her broom—and her legacy—in an Oz wracked by war.

The stirring, long-awaited conclusion to the bestselling series begun with Wicked, Out of Oz is a magical journey rife with revelations and reversals, reprisals and surprises—the hallmarks of the unique imagination of Gregory Maguire.

Civilization: The West and the Rest by Niall Ferguson   CB 245 .F37 2011

From one of our most renowned historians, Civilization is the definitive history of Western civilization’s rise to global dominance-and the “killer applications” that made this improbable ascent possible.

The rise to global predominance of Western civilization is the single most important historical phenomenon of the past five hundred years. All over the world, an astonishing proportion of people now work for Western-style companies, study at Western-style universities, vote for Western-style governments, take Western medicines, wear Western clothes, and even work Western hours. Yet six hundred years ago the petty kingdoms of Western Europe seemed unlikely to achieve much more than perpetual internecine warfare. It was Ming China or Ottoman Turkey that had the look of world civilizations. How did the West overtake its Eastern rivals? And has the zenith of Western power now passed?

In Civilization: The West and the Rest, bestselling author Niall Ferguson argues that, beginning in the fifteenth century, the West developed six powerful new concepts that the Rest lacked: competition, science, the rule of law, consumerism, modern medicine, and the work ethic. These were the “killer applications” that allowed the West to leap ahead of the Rest, opening global trade routes, exploiting newly discovered scientific laws, evolving a system of representative government, more than doubling life expectancy, unleashing the Industrial Revolution, and embracing a dynamic work ethic. Civilization shows just how fewer than a dozen Western empires came to control more than half of humanity and four fifths of the world economy.

Yet now, Ferguson argues, the days of Western predominance are numbered-not because of clashes with rival civilizations, but simply because the Rest have now downloaded the six killer apps we once monopolized-while the West has literally lost faith in itself.

Civilization does more than tell the gripping story of the West’s slow rise and sudden demise; it also explains world history with verve, clarity, and wit. Controversial but cogent and compelling, Civilization is Ferguson at his very best.

The Night Eternal : book III of the strain trilogy by Guillermo Del Toro and Chuck Hogan     PS 3620 .O5875 N54 2011

It’s been two years since the vampiric virus was unleashed in The Strain, and the entire world now lies on the brink of annihilation. There is only night as nuclear winter blankets the land, the sun filtering through the poisoned atmosphere for two hours each day—the perfect environment for the propagation of vampires.

There has been a mass extermination of humans, the best and the brightest, the wealthy and the influential, orchestrated by the Master—an ancient vampire possessed of unparalleled powers—who selects survivors based on compliance. Those humans who remain are entirely subjugated, interred in camps, and separated by status: those who breed more humans, and those who are bled for the sustenance of the Master’s vast army.

The future of humankind lies in the hands of a ragtag band of freedom fighters—Dr. Eph Goodweather, former head of the Centers for Disease Control’s biological threats team; Dr. Nora Martinez, a fellow doctor with a talent for dispatching the undead; Vasiliy Fet, the colorful Russian exterminator; and Mr. Quinlan, the half-breed offspring of the Master who is bent on revenge. It’s their job to rescue Eph’s son, Zack, and overturn this devastating new world order. But good and evil are malleable terms now, and the Master is most skilled at preying on the weaknesses of humans.

Now, at this critical hour, there is evidence of a traitor in their midst. . . . And only one man holds the answer to the Master’s demise, but is he one who can be trusted with the fate of the world? And who among them will pay the ultimate sacrifice—so that others may be saved?

 

Snuff: A Novel of Discworld by Terry Pratchett    PR 6066 .R34 S65 2011 

For nearly three decades, Terry Pratchett has enthralled millions of fans worldwide with his irreverent, wonderfully funny satires set in the fabulously imaginative Discworld, a universe remarkably similar to our own. From sports to religion, politics to education, science to capitalism, and everything in between, Pratchett has skewered sacred cows with both laughter and wisdom, and exposed our warts, foibles, and eccentricities in a unique, entertaining, and ultimately serious way.

At long last, Lady Sybil has lured her husband, Sam Vimes, on a well-deserved holiday away from the crime and grime of Ankh-Morpork. But for the commander of the City Watch, a vacation in the country is anything but relaxing. The balls, the teas, the muck—not to mention all that fresh air and birdsong—are more than a bit taxing on a cynical city-born and -bred copper.

Yet a policeman will find a crime anywhere if he decides to look hard enough, and it’s not long before a body is discovered, and Sam—out of his jurisdiction, out of his element, and out of bacon sandwiches (thanks to his well-meaning wife)—must rely on his instincts, guile, and street smarts to see justice done. As he sets off on the chase, though, he must remember to watch where he steps. . . . This is the countryside, after all, and the streets most definitely are not paved with gold.

The Prague Cemetery  by Umberto Eco     PQ 4865 .C6 C4613 2011

Nineteenth-century Europe—from Turin to Prague to Paris—abounds with the ghastly and the mysterious. Conspiracies rule history. Jesuits plot against Freemasons. Italian republicans strangle priests with their own intestines. French criminals plan bombings by day and celebrate Black Masses at night. Every nation has its own secret service, perpetrating forgeries, plots, and massacres. From the unification of Italy to the Paris Commune to the Dreyfus Affair to The Protocols of the Elders of Zion, Europe is in tumult and everyone needs a scapegoat. But what if, behind all of these conspiracies both real and imagined, lay one lone man? What if that evil genius created its most infamous document?

Eco takes his readers on an unforgettable journey through the underbelly of world-shattering events. Eco at his most exciting, a book immediately hailed as a masterpiece.

West by West: My Charmed, Tormented Life by Jerry West and Jonathan Coleman  GV 884 .W4 A3 2011

He is one of basketball’s towering figures: “Mr. Clutch,” who mesmerized his opponents and fans. The coach who began the Lakers’ resurgence in the 1970s. The general manager who helped bring “Showtime” to Los Angeles, creating a championship-winning force that continues to this day.
Now, for the first time, the legendary Jerry West tells his story-from his tough childhood in West Virginia, to his unbelievable college success at West Virginia University, his 40-year career with the Los Angeles Lakers, and his relationships with NBA legends like Bill Russell, Wilt Chamberlain, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Magic Johnson, Shaquille O’Neal, and Kobe Bryant. Unsparing in its self-assessment and honesty, WEST BY WEST is far more than a sports memoir: it is a profound confession and a magnificent inspiration.
 
 Being George Washington: The Indispensable Man, as You’ve Never Seen Him by Glenn Beck       E 312.25 .B44 2011
 
IF YOU THINK YOU KNOW GEORGE WASHINGTON, THINK AGAIN.This is the amazing true story of a real-life superhero who wore no cape and possessed no special powers—yet changed the world forever. It’s a story about a man whose life reads as if it were torn from the pages of an action novel: Bullet holes through his clothing. Horses shot out from under him. Unimaginable hardship. Disease. Heroism. Spies and double-agents. And, of course, the unmistakable hand of Divine Providence that guided it all.Being George Washington is a whole new way to look at history. You won’t simply read about the awful winter spent at Valley Forge—you’ll live it right alongside Washington. You’ll be on the boat with him crossing the Delaware, in the trenches with him at Yorktown, and standing next to him at the Constitutional Convention as a new republic is finally born.Through these stories you’ll not only learn our real history (and how it applies to today), you’ll also see how the media and others have distorted our view of it. It’s ironic that the best-known fact about George Washington—that he chopped down a cherry tree—is a complete lie. It’s even more ironic when you consider that a lie was thought necessary to prove he could not tell one.For all of his heroism and triumphs, Washington’s single greatest accomplishment was the man he created in the process: courageous and principled, fair and just, respectful to all. But he was also something else: flawed.It’s those flaws that should give us hope for today. After all, if Washington had been perfect, then there would be no way to build another one. That’s why this book is not just about being George Washington in 1776, it’s about the struggle to be him every single day of our lives. Understanding the way he turned himself from an uneducated farmer into the Indispensable (yet imperfect) Man, is the only way to build a new generation of George Washingtons that can take on the extraordinary challenges that America is once again facing.
 
 The Wedding Quilt: An Elm Creek Quilts Novel by Jennifer Chiaverini                     PS 3553 .H473 W43 2011b
 

The New York Times bestselling Elm Creek Quilts series continues, with a novel that celebrates one of America’s most romantic and enduring traditions.

Sarah McClure arrived at Elm Creek Manor as a newlywed, never suspecting that her quilting lessons with master quilter Sylvia Bergstrom Compson would inspire the successful and enduring business Elm Creek Quilts, whose members have nurtured a circle of friendship spanning generations.

The Wedding Quilt opens as the wedding day of Sarah’s daughter Caroline approaches. As Sarah has learned, a union celebrates not only the betrothed couple’s passage into wedlock, but also the contributions of those who have made the bride and groom the unique people they are. Thus Sarah’s thoughts are filled with brides of Elm Creek Manor past and present-the traditions they honored, the legacies they bequeathed, and the wedding quilts that contain their stories in every stitch.

A wedding quilt is a powerful metaphor: of sisterhood, of community, of hope for the future. The blocks in Caroline’s wedding quilt will display the signatures of beloved guests. As the Elm Creek Quilters circulate amid the festive preparations with pens and fabric in hand, memories of the Manor-and of the women who have lived there, in happiness and in sorrow-spill forth, rendering a vivid pastiche of family, friendship, and love in all its varieties.

New books

 Ethics (Opposing Viewpoints)- Roman Espejo, Book Editor                                        BJ 1025 .E825 2010

 

Celebrity Culture (Opposing Viewpoints) Book Editor, Roman Espejo                                BJ 1470.5 .C46 2011

 

Does the World Hate the U.S.? (At Issue) Roman Espejo, Book Editor                       E 895 .D64 2009

 

The Role of the Government (Confronting Global Warning) by Jacqueline Langwith                       GE 180 .R65 2011

 

The Role of the Individual (Confronting Global Warming) by Rebecca Ferguson  GE 195 .F47 2011

 

The Culture of Beauty (Global Viewpoints) Laruie Willis, Book Editor                     GT 499 .C85 2011

 

Tax Reform (Opposing Viewpoints) Noel Merino, Book Editor                              HJ 2381 .T384 2011

 

Reforming Wall Street (Opposing Viewpoints)  David Haugen and Susan Musser, Book Editors           HB 3722 .R427 2001

 

 The World Economy (Current Controversies) Noel Merino, Book Editor                                        HB 3722 .W67 2010

 

 Should the U.S. Reduce its Consumption?  (At Issue) David Haugen and Susan Musser, Book Editors                                         HC 110 .C6 S54 2011

 

 Deregulation (Opposing Viewpoints) Dedria Bryfonski, Book Editor                                     HD 3616 .U47 D425  2011

 

Drunk Driving (At issue) Stefan Kiebye, Book Editor                                           HE 5620 .D72 D785 2011

 

Advertising (Opposing Viewpoints)  Roman Espejo, Book Editor                                          HF 5831 .A342 2010

 

Consumer Debt (Current Controversies) Joseph Tardiff, Book Editor                                 HG 3755 .C588 2010

 

Do Abstinence Programs Work? (At Issue) Christina Fisanick, Book Editor                                              HQ 27 .D69 2010

 

Homosexuality (Opposing Viewpoints)  Cynthia A. Bily, Book Editor                                       HQ 76.25 .H67375 2009

 

Human Trafficking (Current Controversies)  Christina Fisanick, Book Editor                        HQ 281 .H864 2010

 

 Child Pornography (At Issue)  Amanda Hiber, Book Editor                                            HQ 471 .C45 2009

 

Marriage (Global Viewpoints) Alicia Cafferty Lerner, Book Editor                                               HQ 734 .M35 2009

 

Teen Pregnancy and Parenting (Current Controversies) Lisa Krueger, Book Editor                       HQ 759.4 .T4252 2011

Beauty Pageants (At Issue)   Noel Merino, Book Editor                                                   HQ 1219 .B349 2010

 

Women in Islam (At Issue)  Diane Andrews Henningfeld, Book Editor                                            HQ 1170 .W577 2011

 

 Slavery Today (At Issue) Ronald D. Lankford, Jr., Book Editor                                                HT 867 .S53 2010

 

Foster Care (At Issue) Debra Bloom, Book Editor                                                     HV 713 .F67 2010

 

 

Chemical Dependency (Opposing Viewpoints) Roman Espejo, Book Editor                               HV 4998 .C444 2011

 

Teen Drug Abuse (Opposing Viewpoints) David E. Nelson, Book Editor                                                  HV 5824 .Y68 T43 2011

 

 Drug Legalization (Current Controversies) Noel Merino, Book Editor                                                HV 5825 .D77667 2011

 

Piracy on the High Seas (At Issue)  Noah Berlatsky, Book Editor                                           HV 6433.785 .P57 2010

 

Gangs (Opposing Viewpoints) Adela Soliz, Book Editor                                                     HV 6439 .U5 G3586 2009

 

Domestic Violence (Opposing Viewpoints) Mike Wilson, Book Editor                                                    HV 6626 .D634 2009

 

Child Abuse (Opposing Viewpoints) Heidi Williams, Book Editor                                HV 6626.5 .C4716 2009

 

Racial Profiling (Opposing Viewpoints) David Erik Nelson, Book Editor                                               HV 7936 .R3 R323 2009

 

Racial Profiling (At Issue) Kathy L. Hahn, Book Editor                                                 HV 7936 .R3 R326 2011

 

 Is Torture Ever Justified? (At Issue) Tsamara L. Roleff, Book Editor                                                         HV 8593 .I8 2011

 

 Is Socialism Harmful? (At Issue) Ronald d. Lankford, Jr., Book Editor                                   HX 86 .I79 2011

 

Human Rights (Global Viewpoints) Margaret Haerens, Book Editor                                            JC 571 .H76846 2011

 

Voter Fraud (At Issue) Roman Espejo, Book Editor                                        JK 1994 .V68 2010

 

Immigration (Opposing Viewpoints) David M. Haugen, Susan Musser and Kacy Lovelace, Book Editors      JV 6465 .I4715 2009

 

Globalization (Opposing Viewpoints) David Haugen and Rachael Mach, Book Editors                   JZ 1318 .G5786223 2010

 Taxation (Issues on Trial) Sylvia Engdahl, Book Editor                                     KF 6289.85 .T39 2011

 Education (Opposing Viewpoints) David Haugen and Susan Musser, Book Editors           LA 217.2 .E34 2009

 

1,000 Fingerplays & Action Rhymes (BOOK and DVD) by Barbara A. Scott                        LB 1139.5 .A68 S35 2010

 

School Reform (Opposing viewpoints) Noah Berlatsky, Book Editor                              LB 2806 .S3424 2011

Is Media Violence a Problem? (At Issue) Stefan Kiesbye, Book Editor                           P 96 .V5 I82 2010

 

Television (Opposing Viewpoints) Margaret Haerens, Book Editor                                      PN 1992.6 .T3775 2011

 

Global Warming (Opposing Viewpoints) David Haugen, Susan Musser, and Kacy Lovelace, Book Editors                                     QC 981.8 .G56 G578 2010

Genetic Engineering (Opposing Viewpoints) David M. Haugen and Susan Musser, Book Editors                                                  QH 442 .G446 2009

 

 Medical Ethics (Current Controversies) Noel Meriono, Book Editor                                  R 724 .M29274 2011

 

Health Care (Current Controversies) Noel Merino, Book Editor                                                   RA 395 .A3 H3857 2011

 

The Uninsured (Current Controversies) Debra A. Miller, Book Editor                                        RA 413.7 .U53 U535 2011

Behavioral Disorders (Opposing viewpoints) Louise I. Gerdes, Book Editor                                 RJ 506 .B44 B435 2010

 

Obesity (Opposing viewpoints) Scott Barbour, Book Editor                                    RA 645 .O23 O22 2011

 

Wave and Tidal Power (At Issue) Louise I. Gerdes, Book Editor                                                  TC 147 .W375 2011

Water (Opposing Viewpoints) Jacqueline Langwith, Book Editor                                                        TD 348 .W377 2010

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Books

 

Becoming King: Martin Luther King Jr. and the Making of a National Leader (Civil Rights and the Struggle for Black Equality in the Twentieth Century) by Troy Jackson

E 185.97 .K5 J343 2008

“The history books may write it Reverend King was born in Atlanta, and then came to Montgomery, but we feel that he was born in Montgomery in the struggle here, and now he is moving to Atlanta for bigger responsibilities.” — Member of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, November 1959 Preacher — this simple term describes the twenty-five-year-old Ph.D. in theology who arrived in Montgomery, Alabama, to become the pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in 1954. His name was Martin Luther King Jr., but where did this young minister come from? What did he believe, and what role would he play in the growing activism of the civil rights movement of the 1950s? In Becoming King: Martin Luther King Jr. and the Making of a National Leader, author Troy Jackson chronicles King’s emergence and effectiveness as a civil rights leader by examining his relationship with the people of Montgomery, Alabama. Using the sharp lens of Montgomery’s struggle for racial equality to investigate King’s burgeoning leadership, Jackson explores King’s ability to connect with the educated and the unlettered, professionals and the working class. In particular, Jackson highlights King’s alliances with Jo Ann Robinson, a young English professor at Alabama State University; E. D. Nixon, a middle-aged Pullman porter and head of the local NAACP chapter; and Virginia Durr, a courageous white woman who bailed Rosa Parks out of jail after Parks refused to give up her bus seat to a white person. Jackson offers nuanced portrayals of King’s relationships with these and other civil rights leaders in the community to illustrate King’s development within the community. Drawing on countless interviews and archival sources, Jackson compares King’s sermons and religious writings before, during, and after the Montgomery bus boycott. Jackson demonstrates how King’s voice and message evolved during his time in Montgomery, reflecting the shared struggles, challenges, experiences, and hopes of the people with whom he worked. Many studies of the civil rights movement end analyses of Montgomery’s struggle with the conclusion of the bus boycott and the establishment of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Jackson surveys King’s uneasy post-boycott relations with E. D. Nixon and Rosa Parks, shedding new light on Parks’s plight in Montgomery after the boycott and revealing the internal discord that threatened the movement’s hard-won momentum. The controversies within the Montgomery Improvement Association compelled King to position himself as a national figure who could rise above the quarrels within the movement and focus on attaining its greater goals. Though the Montgomery struggle thrust King into the national spotlight, the local impact on the lives of blacks from all socioeconomic classes was minimal at the time. As the citizens of Montgomery awaited permanent change, King left the city, taking the lessons he learned there onto the national stage. In the crucible of Montgomery, Martin Luther King Jr. was transformed from an inexperienced Baptist preacher into a civil rights leader of profound national importance.

Deep Blue Home: An Intimate Ecology of Our Wild Ocean by Julia Whitty

GC 231.2 .W49 2010

At the center of Deep Blue Home—a penetrating exploration of the ocean as single vast current and of the creatures dependent on it—is Whitty’s description of the three-dimensional ocean river, far more powerful than the Nile or the Amazon, encircling the globe. It’s a watery force connected to the earth’s climate control and so to the eventual fate of the human race.

Whitty’s thirty-year career as a documentary filmmaker and diver has given her sustained access to the scientists dedicated to the study of an astonishing range of ocean life, from the physiology of “extremophile” life forms to the strategies of nesting seabirds to the ecology of “whale falls” (what happens upon the death of a behemoth).

No stranger to extreme adventure, Whitty travels the oceanside and underwater world from the Sea of Cortez to Newfoundland to Antarctica. In the Galapagos, in one of the book’s most haunting encounters, she realizes: “I am about to learn the answer to my long-standing question about what would happen to a person in the water if a whale sounded directly alongside—would she, like a person afloat beside a sinking ship, be dragged under too?”

This book provides extraordinary armchair entree to gripping adventure, cutting-edge science, and an intimate understanding of our deep blue home.

The Unmaking of Israel by Gershom Gorenberg

HD 850.5 .Z63 G67 2011

In this penetrating and provocative look at the state of contemporary Israel, acclaimed Israeli historian and journalist Gershom Gorenberg reveals how the nation’s policies are undermining its democracy and existence as a Jewish state, and explains what must be done to bring it back from the brink. Refuting shrill defenses of Israel and equally strident attacks, Gorenberg shows that the Jewish state is, in fact, unique among countries born in the postcolonial era: It began as a parliamentary democracy and has remained one. An activist judiciary has established civil rights. Despite discrimination against its Arab minority, Israel has given a political voice to everyone within its borders.

Yet shortsighted policies, unintended consequences, and the refusal to heed warnings now threaten those accomplishments. By keeping the territories it occupied in the Six-Day War, Israel has crippled its democracy and the rule of law. The unholy ties between state, settlement, and synagogue have promoted a new brand of extremism, transforming Judaism from a humanistic to a militant faith. And the religious right is rapidly gaining power within the Israeli army, with possibly catastrophic consequences.

In order to save itself, Gorenberg argues, Israel must end the occupation, separate state from religion, and create a new civil Israeli identity that can be shared by Jews and Arabs. Based on groundbreaking historical research—including documents released through the author’s Israeli Supreme Court challenge to military secrecy—and on a quarter century of experience reporting in the region, The Unmaking of Israel is a brilliant, deeply personal critique by a progressive Israeli, and a plea for realizing the nation’s potential.

America’s Water and Wastewater Crisis: The Role of Private Enterprise by Lewis D. Solomon

HD 1694 .A5 S74 2011

This book examines the role of private firms in the American water and wastewater industry. As more water infrastructure shifts from public- to private-sector control, vendors, consultants, and facilities are taking on more importance. Solomon presents an historical overview of water supply and treatment needs over time and the role of the government, including how water policy has been crafted. He argues that water scarcity is becoming a major problem due to groundwater depletion, contamination, and patterns of consumption. He also examines the impact of climate change on water availability and quality considering voluntary conservation programs and mandatory restrictions for water use.

Solomon also points to how for-profit firms can use technology to increase water supply. There are a number of options: by water reuse and desaliniation, reducing water losses due to decaying infrastructure, implementing irrigation technology, and increasing efficiency, thereby decreasing consumption. He describes what privatiation would look like in practice and reviews evidence from two case studies. Solomon proposes privatiation as a viable response to America’s water crisis, only that can address both scarcity and capital problems.

America’s Water and Wastewater Crisis presents a careful examination of how the water industry has operated in the U.S. in the past and how it may work as we move into the future.

Drowning in Oil: BP & the Reckless Pursuit of Profit by Loren C. Steffy

HD 9574 .M63 S74 2011

As night settled on April 20, 2010, a series of explosions rocked Deepwater Horizon, the immense semisubmersible drilling platform leased by British Petroleum, located 40 miles off the Louisiana coast. The ensuing inferno claimed 11 lives, and it would rage uncontained for two days, until its wreckage sank to a final resting place nearly a mile beneath the waves. On the ocean floor, the unit’s wellhead erupted. Over the next ten weeks, as repeated attempts to cap the geyser failed, an estimated 200 million gallons of oil—the equivalent of 20 Exxon Valdez spills—spewed into the Gulf of Mexico, eventually lapping up on beaches as far away as Florida.

Drowning in Oil, by award-winning Houston Chronicle business reporter and columnist Loren Steffy—considered by many to be the writer with the best access to the story—is an unprecedented and gripping narrative of this catastrophe and how BP’s winner-take-all business culture made it all but inevitable.

Through never-before-published interviews with BP executives and employees, environmental experts, and oil industry insiders, Steffy takes us behind the scenes of 100 years of BP corporate history. Beginning with the conglomerate’s early gambits in the Middle East to its recent ascent among energy titans, Steff unearths the roots of the Gulf oil spill in the unwritten bargain between oil producers and consumers, whose insatiable appetites drive the search for new supplies faster, farther, and deeper.

Beyond this, the Deepwater Horizon disaster took place after a history of cost cutting in pursuit of profits, particularly under the guidance of its two most recent ex-CEOs, John Browne and Anthony Hayward.

Exhaustively researched and documented, Drowning in Oil is the first in-depth examination of how a lack of corporate responsibility and government oversight led to the biggest offshore oil spill in U.S. history. It is an objective, no-punches-pulled account of the energy industry: its environmental impact and the intense competition among stakeholders in today’s oil markets.

This book puts all the pieces together, offering a definitive account of BP’s pursuit of outsized profits as the industrial world awakens to the grim realities of Peak Oil.

MicroMarketing: Get Big Results by Thinking and Acting Small by Greg Verdino

HF 5415 .V377 2010

In our age of information saturation, consumer attention is the scarcest commodity of all—which makes your job tougher than ever. How do you thread your messages through billions of bite-sized information snapshots to reach the right people? One thing’s for sure, you’re not going to succeed using traditional approaches. Mass marketing is dead; the next big thing is indeed very small.

microMARKETING empowers you to rethink, retool, and revitalize your marketing strategies to take full advantage of the opportunities created by the microcontent explosion. A pioneer in the world of microcontent marketing, Greg Verdino helps you create a strategy that emphasizes relationships over reach, interaction over interruption, and social networking over broadcast networks.

You’ll find the answers to today’s toughest questions:

  • How do I earn the attention of the right influencers and my core customers?
  • How do I really build my brand one blog post, one video clip, or even one tweet at a time?
  • How do I achieve massive scale when mainstream media is losing ground to consumer content creators and peer-to- peer distribution?
  • How do I strike a balance between tapping into today’s biggest marketing trends without losing sight of the little things that matter?

When one door closes, another opens. Mass marketing is no longer a viable marketing strategy and, likely, never will be again. Micromarketing, though, enables you to resonate with consumers in compelling new ways and achieve the big results that no longer seem possible with traditional approaches.

It’s time to start building your brand, finding new customers, establishing relationships, and getting real results on this exciting new frontier. microMARKETING will show you the way.

 

The Fetal Position: A Rational Approach to the Abortion Issue by Chris Meyers

 HQ 767.15 .M49 2010

The Fetal Position, examines the morality of abortion. The book provides a philosophical analysis of arguments given for the pro-life and for the pro-choice positions. The intention is not to advocate for either view, but to elevate the level of debate from slogans and rhetoric to reflective critical reasoning. Thus readers are left to decide for themselves which side makes the better case. Though it is a philosophy book, it is intended for a general audience (rhather than for professional philosophers).

Dirty South: OutKast, Lil Wayne, Soulja Boy, and the Southern Rappers Who Reinvented Hip-Hop by Ben Westhoff
ML 3521 .W47 2011
Rap music from New York and Los Angeles once ruled the charts, but nowadays the southern sound thoroughly dominates the radio, Billboard, and MTV. Coastal artists like Wu-Tang Clan, Nas, and Ice-T call southern rap “garbage,” but they’re probably just jealous, as artists like Lil Wayne and T.I. still move millions of copies, and OutKast has the bestselling rap album of all time.

In Dirty South, author Ben Westhoff investigates the southern rap phenomenon, watching rappers “make it rain” in a Houston strip club and partying with the 2 Live Crew’s Luke Campbell. Westhoff visits the gritty neighborhoods where T.I. and Lil Wayne grew up, kicks it with Big Boi in Atlanta, and speaks with artists like DJ Smurf and Ms. Peachez, dance-craze originators accused of setting back the black race fifty years. Acting both as investigative journalist and irreverent critic, Westhoff probes the celebrated-but-dark history of Houston label Rap-A-Lot Records, details the lethal rivalry between Atlanta MCs Gucci Mane and Young Jeezy, and gets venerable rapper Scarface to open up about his time in a mental institution. Dirty South features exclusive interviews with the genre’s most colorful players.

Westhoff has written a journalistic tour de force, the definitive account of the most vital musical culture of our time.

 

Droppin Science Critical Essays on Rap Music and Hip Hop Culture edited by William Eric Perkins
ML 3531 .D77 1996
Hip Hop America by Nelson George
ML 3531 .G46 2005
Now with a new introduction by the author, Hip Hop America is the definitive account of the society-altering collision between black youth culture and the mass media.

 The Oedipus Plays of Sophocles: Oedipus the King; Oedipus at Colonus; Antigone by Sophocles translated by Paul Roche

PA 4414 .A2 2004

To Laius, King of Thebes, an oracle foretold that the child born to him by his queen Jocasta would slay his father and wed his mother. So when in time a son was born the infant’s feet were riveted together and he was left to die on Mount Cithaeron. But a shepherd found the babe and tended him, and delivered him to another shepherd who took him to his master, the King or Corinth. Polybus being childless adopted the boy, who grew up believing that he was indeed the King’s son.
  Sophocles in an Hour (Playwrights in an Hour) by Carl R. Mueller                          PA 441 .M84 2009
BOOK SYNOPSIS When he was not writing tragedies, acting in his own plays, and innovating ancient Greek theater, Sophocles served as an ordained priest at a temple for the god of medicine. Thinking about the end of life, Sophocles began outlining Oedipus the King, a tragedy that examines fate, death, and the mysterious depths of the human psyche themes that he explored in all of his masterful plays.
Setting the playwright in context to his personal life, social, historical and political events, other writers of influence, and more, you will quickly gain a deep understanding of Sophocles and the plays he wrote. Read Sophocles in an Hour and experience his plays like never before. Know the playwright, love the play!

Chekhov in an Hour (Playwrights in an Hour) by Carol Rocamora                              PG 3458 .Z8 R625 2010As a schoolboy, Anton Chekhov stole into the local theater at night, dressed as his father, and marveled at the plays of Shakespeare and Moliere. Mesmerized by the characters on the stage, he went on to write his own tragicomedies: The Seagull, Uncle Vanya, The Three Sisters, and The Cherry Orchard.
Setting the playwright in context to his personal life, social, historical and political events, other writers of influence, and more, you will quickly gain a deep understanding of Chekhov and the plays he wrote. Read Chekhov in an Hour and experience his plays like never before. Know the playwright, love the play!

 

Annie Oakley’s Girl by Rebecca Brown

PS 3552 .R6973 A83 1993

 

Accidental Birds of the Carolinas by Marjoire Hudson

PS 3558 .U3116 A23 2011

Like birds blown off course, the characters in these stories need a place to roost-somewhere to settle long enough to repair their ragged hearts-and they find it near the banks of the mythical Sissipahaw River. In the centerpiece story, an eighteenth-century Eno Indian tells of the fiery fate of his adopted father, English explorer John Lawson. In the surrounding stories, the age-old conflicts between newcomer and old-timer play out as twenty-first century retirees, carnies, runaways, heartbroken women, and farmers stumble into new lives and new insights in Ambler County, North Carolina. “Hudson’s prose is pure as birdsong,” says novelist Doris Betts. “These fine stories of change and discovery are a field guide to the human species in transition.”
 Carver: A Life in Poems by Marilyn Nelson
PS 3573 .A4795 C37 2001
This collection of poems assembled by award-winning writer Marilyn Nelson provides young readers with a compelling, lyrical account of the life of revered African-American botanist and inventor George Washington Carver. Born in 1864 and raised by white slave owners, Carver left home in search of an education and eventually earned a master’s degree in agriculture. In 1896, he was invited by Booker T. Washington to head the agricultural department at the all-black-staffed Tuskegee Institute. There he conducted innovative research to find uses for crops such as cowpeas, sweet potatoes, and peanuts, while seeking solutions to the plight of landless black farmers. Through 44 poems, told from the point of view of Carver and the people who knew him, Nelson celebrates his character and accomplishments. She includes prose summaries of events and archival photographs.
Geology for Nongeologists (Science for Nonscientists)
QE 31 .S64 2009
      Geology for Nongeologists introduces basic concepts in geology: how rocks, minerals, and fossils are classified, how wind, ice, and water have shaped the earth, how mountains are formed, and how volcanoes, geysers, earthquakes, glaciers, and groundwater work to modify the physical structure of Earth.
Primarily designed as an information source, and intended to be a non-technical survey for those with little background in science, this book is presented in a reader-friendly style. Written in straightforward and accessible English, this book provides a broad look at a multidisciplinary field that incorporates aspects of biology, chemistry, physics, ecology, geography, meteorology, pedology, and many other areas of science.
This book fills the gap between general introductory science texts and advanced environmental science books. Books on the subject are typically geared toward professionals in these fields. This makes undertaking a study of geology daunting to those without a specific background in science. However, this complexity also indicates geology’s broad impact. Because geology so widely affects us, sometimes in profound ways, it is important to understand its basic concepts. This book presents information that everyone needs to know about geology and about how science and scientists work.
The author uses illustrative problems in terms of commonly used geological parameters, and each chapter ends with a chapter review test. Readers discover a new appreciation for their surroundings and a broader outlook on their environment.
 Plastic: A Toxic Love Story by Susan Freinkel
TP 1120 .F74 2011
Plastic built the modern world. Where would we be without bike helmets, baggies, toothbrushes, and pacemakers? But a century into our love affair with plastic, we’re starting to realize it’s not such a healthy relationship. Plastics draw on dwindling fossil fuels, leach harmful chemicals, litter landscapes, and destroy marine life. As journalist Susan Freinkel points out in this engaging and eye-opening book, we’re nearing a crisis point. We’ve produced as much plastic in the past decade as we did in the entire twentieth century. We’re drowning in the stuff, and we need to start making some hard choices.
Freinkel gives us the tools we need with a blend of lively anecdotes and analysis. She combs through scientific studies and economic data, reporting from China and across the United States to assess the real impact of plastic on our lives. She tells her story through eight familiar plastic objects: comb, chair, Frisbee, IV bag, disposable lighter, grocery bag, soda bottle, and credit card. Her conclusion: we cannot stay on our plastic-paved path. And we don’t have to. Plastic points the way toward a new creative partnership with the material we love to hate but can’t seem to live without.
 More Hands-On Information Literacy Activities by Fiona Hunt and Jane Birks
ZA 3075 .H86 2008    (book and CD Rom)
Authors Fiona Hunt and Jane Birks have tackled the 21st century digital information environment to bring you a new collection of library and classroom activities that support both secondary and undergraduate college students information literacy skill development. The book s 20 activities are suitable for both mainstream and ESL environments, and feature strategies to help students determine their information needs, access and evaluate information, and use and cite information ethically. Adaptable and easy-to-use exercises focus on the use of keywords, brainstorming, library orientation, search strings, evaluation of information, citation tips, and avoiding plagiarism, and a companion CDROM includes all supporting handouts, worksheets and answer keys. While today s students may be Web-savvy, they are not necessarily information literate. This book will help you teach the strategies and techniques of intelligent information use, engaging students in active, productive explorations of the library and its resources.
YOUNG ADULT
A Thousand Years of Pirates by William Gilkerson
YAdult G 535 .G54 2009
For as long as they’ve existed, pirates have conjured up visions of high-seas adventure and skullduggery, sea chases and bloody battles, dangerous coastal lairs and buried treasure. Rightly so, for ever since ships have carried valuable cargo, pirates have enraged monarchs and struck terror into the hearts of honest seamen with their willingness to risk life and limb for an undeserved share of the riches. Whether the cargo was gold or silver, spices or silks, animal or human, there have always been villains ruthless enough to kill or be hanged for it.
From the days of the Vikings to the present and in all the oceans of the world, pirates have made their presence known and feared. Recorded here are their stories along with striking images of ships, storms at sea, and secret harbors where “black ships” could be re-stocked and refitted.
Award-winning author and artist William Gilkerson has spent years researching and painting their colorful history. From the terrible Black Beard to the fascinating Granuaile, or Grace O’Malley as the English called her, they have come to life under his brush. One can almost hear the creak of timbers, the snap of canvas while turning the pages. This gift book is a rich treasure in its own right.
CHILDREN LITERATURE
 Rivers: Natures’s Busy Waterways (Earthworks (Honesdale, Pa.)) By David L. Harrison
ChildLit GB 1203.8 .H36 2002
Ages 5-8. From a trickle of raindrops and melting snow in the mountains a river is born. What happens after that? Harrison explains how trickles turn into rills, rills into streamlets, streamlets into streams that form deep channels as they grow. The text, awkwardly presented in verse, also describes how much depends on rivers: people need them, of course, as do trees, flowers, and the tiny creatures at the bottom of the complex aquatic food chain. Full-page, color illustrations with a slightly three-dimensional look show how rivers are built–dirt and pebbles grinding the banks and bottoms to make them wider and deeper and the river floor flattening as time passes. There’s also basic information on conservation and pollution–along with a clear sense of the wonder of it all. An author’s note and bibliography are appended. Shelley Townsend-Hudson

 

Do You Know Which Ones Will Grow?
ChildLit PZ 8.3 .S539 Do 2011

 

A duckling grows and becomes a duck, so can a car grow into a truck? This beguiling book about growth will sparks kids’imaginations, as gatefolds playfully transform a watch into a clock and a shovel into a plow. The interactive format of question and answer will entrance young readers as living things that grow are compared to inanimate objects that don’t. Ingenious!

 

 

Best Sellers moved to circulating collection

Bonnie (Eve Duncan) by Iris Johansen     PS 3560 .O275 B66 2011

The truth has eluded her for years. . . . Now is she ready to face it?

When Eve Duncan gave birth to her daughter, she experienced a love she never knew existed. Nothing would stand in the way of giving Bonnie a wonderful life—until the unthinkable happened and the seven-year-old vanished into thin air. Eve found herself in the throes of a nightmare from which there was no escape. But a new Eve emerged: a woman who would use her remarkable talent as a forensic sculptor to help others find closure in the face of tragedy. Now with the help of her beloved Joe Quinn and CIA agent Catherine Ling, Eve has come closer than ever to the truth. But the deeper she digs, the more she realizes that Bonnie’s father is a key player in solving this monstrous puzzle. And that Bonnie’s disappearance was not as random as everyone had always believed . . .

 
 Catherine the Great: Portrait of a Woman by Robert K. Massie   DK 170 .M34 2011
 
The Pulitzer Prize–winning author of Peter the Great, Nicholas and Alexandra, and The Romanovs returns with another masterpiece of narrative biography, the extraordinary story of an obscure young German princess who traveled to Russia at fourteen and rose to become one of the most remarkable, powerful, and captivating women in history.Born into a minor noble family, Catherine transformed herself into Empress of Russia by sheer determination. Possessing a brilliant mind and an insatiable curiosity as a young woman, she devoured the works of Enlightenment philosophers and, when she reached the throne, attempted to use their principles to guide her rule of the vast and backward Russian empire. She knew or corresponded with the preeminent historical figures of her time: Voltaire, Diderot, Frederick the Great, Empress Maria Theresa of Austria, Marie Antoinette, and, surprisingly, the American naval hero, John Paul Jones.Reaching the throne fired by Enlightenment philosophy and determined to become the embodiment of the “benevolent despot” idealized by Montesquieu, she found herself always contending with the deeply ingrained realities of Russian life, including serfdom. She persevered, and for thirty-four years the government, foreign policy, cultural development, and welfare of the Russian people were in her hands. She dealt with domestic rebellion, foreign wars, and the tidal wave of political change and violence churned up by the French Revolution that swept across Europe. Her reputation depended entirely on the perspective of the speaker. She was praised by Voltaire as the equal of the greatest of classical philosophers; she was condemned by her enemies, mostly foreign, as “the Messalina of the north.”Catherine’s family, friends, ministers, generals, lovers, and enemies—all are here, vividly described. These included her ambitious, perpetually scheming mother; her weak, bullying husband, Peter (who left her lying untouched beside him for nine years after their marriage); her unhappy son and heir, Paul; her beloved grandchildren; and her “favorites”—the parade of young men from whom she sought companionship and the recapture of youth as well as sex. Here, too, is the giant figure of Gregory Potemkin, her most significant lover and possible husband, with whom she shared a passionate correspondence of love and separation, followed by seventeen years of unparalleled mutual achievement.The story is superbly told. All the special qualities that Robert K. Massie brought to Nicholas and Alexandra and Peter the Greatare present here: historical accuracy, depth of understanding, felicity of style, mastery of detail, ability to shatter myth, and a rare genius for finding and expressing the human drama in extraordinary lives.History offers few stories richer in drama than that of Catherine the Great. In this book, this eternally fascinating woman is returned to life.
 

The Time of Our Lives: A conversation about America; Who we are, where we’ve been, and where we need to go now, to recapture the American dream by Tom Brokaw    E 839 .B69 2011

“What happened to the America I thought I knew?” Brokaw writes. “Have we simply wandered off course, but only temporarily? Or have we allowed ourselves to be so divided that we’re easy prey for hijackers who could steer us onto a path to a crash landing? . . . I do have some thoughts, original and inspired by others, for our journey into the heart of a new century.”
Rooted in the values, lessons, and verities of generations past and of his South Dakota upbringing, Brokaw weaves together inspiring stories of Americans who are making a difference and personal stories from his own family history, to engage us in a conversation about our country and to offer ideas for how we can revitalize the promise of the American Dream.
Inviting us to foster a rebirth of family, community, and civic engagement as profound as the one that won World War II, built our postwar prosperity, and ushered in the Civil Rights era, Brokaw traces the exciting, unnerving changes in modern life—in values, education, public service, housing, the Internet, and more—that have transformed our society in the decades since the age of thrift in which he was raised. Offering ideas from Americans who are change agents in their communities, in The Time of Our Lives, Brokaw gives us, a wise, honest, and wide-ranging book, a nourishing vision of hopefulness in an age of dimished expectations.

Back to Work: Why We Need Smart Government for a Strong Economy by Bill Clinton       HC 106.84 .C596 2011

President Bill Clinton gives us his views on the challenges facing the United States today and why government matters—presenting his ideas on restoring economic growth, job creation, financial responsibility, resolving the mortgage crisis, and pursuing a strategy to get us “back in the future business.” He explains how we got into the current economic crisis, and offers specific recommendations on how we can put people back to work, increase bank lending and corporate investment, double our exports, restore our manufacturing base, and create new businesses. He supports President Obama’s emphasis on green technology, saying that changing the way we produce and consume energy is the strategy most likely to spark a fast-growing economy while enhancing our national security.Clinton also stresses that we need a strong private sector and a smart government working together to restore prosperity and progress, demonstrating that whenever we’ve given in to the temptation to blame government for all our problems, we’ve lost our ability to produce sustained economic growth and shared prosperity.Clinton writes, “There is simply no evidence that we can succeed in the twenty-first century with an antigovernment strategy,” based on “a philosophy grounded in ‘you’re on your own’ rather than ‘we’re all in this together.’ ” He believes that conflict between government and the private sector has proved to be good politics but has produced bad policies, giving us a weak economy with not enough jobs, growing income inequality and poverty, and a decline in our competitive position. In the real world, cooperation works much better than conflict, and “Americans need victories in real life.”
 

Blue Nights by Joan Didion     PS 3554 .I33 Z46 2011

From one of our most powerful writers, a work of stunning frankness about losing a daughter. Richly textured with bits of her own childhood and married life with her husband, John Gregory Dunne, and daughter, Quintana Roo, this new book by Joan Didion examines her thoughts, fears, and doubts regarding having children, illness, and growing old.
Blue Nights opens on July 26, 2010, as Didion thinks back to Quintana’s wedding in New York seven years before. Today would be her wedding anniversary. This fact triggers vivid snapshots of Quintana’s childhood—in Malibu, in Brentwood, at school in Holmby Hills. Reflecting on her daughter but also on her role as a parent, Didion asks the candid questions any parent might about how she feels she failed either because cues were not taken or perhaps displaced. “How could I have missed what was clearly there to be seen?” Finally, perhaps we all remain unknown to each other. Seamlessly woven in are incidents Didion sees as underscoring her own age, something she finds hard to acknowledge, much less accept.
Blue Nights—the long, light evening hours that signal the summer solstice, “the opposite of the dying of the brightness, but also its warning”—like The Year of Magical Thinking before it, is an iconic book of incisive and electric honesty, haunting and profoundly moving.
 

No Higher Honor: A Memoir of My Years in Washington by Condoleezza Rice          E 840.8 .R48 A3 2011

From one of the world’s most admired women, this is former National Security Advisor and Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice’s compelling story of eight years serving at the highest levels of government.  In her position as America’s chief diplomat, Rice traveled almost continuously around the globe, seeking common ground among sometimes bitter enemies, forging agreement on divisive issues, and compiling a remarkable record of achievement.
A native of Birmingham, Alabama who overcame the racism of the Civil Rights era to become a brilliant academic and expert on foreign affairs, Rice distinguished herself as an advisor to George W. Bush during the 2000 presidential campaign.  Once Bush was elected, she served as his chief adviser on national-security issues – a job whose duties included harmonizing the relationship between the Secretaries of State and Defense.  It was a role that deepened her bond with the President and ultimately made her one of his closest confidantes.
With the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, Rice found herself at the center of the Administration’s intense efforts to keep America safe.  Here, Rice describes the events of that harrowing day – and the tumultuous days after.  No day was ever the same.  Additionally, Rice also reveals new details of the debates that led to the war in Afghanistan and then Iraq.
The eyes of the nation were once again focused on Rice in 2004 when she appeared before the 9-11 Commission to answer tough questions regarding the country’s preparedness for – and immediate response to – the 9-11 attacks.  Her responses, it was generally conceded, would shape the nation’s perception of the Administration’s competence during the crisis.  Rice conveys just how pressure-filled that appearance was and her surprised gratitude when, in succeeding days, she was broadly saluted for her grace and forthrightness.

From that point forward, Rice was aggressively sought after by the media and regarded by some as the Administration’s most effective champion.
In 2005 Rice was entrusted with even more responsibility when she was charged with helping to shape and carry forward the President’s foreign policy as Secretary of State.  As such, she proved herself a deft crafter of tactics and negotiation aimed to contain or reduce the threat posed by America’s enemies.  Here, she reveals the behind-the-scenes maneuvers that kept the world’s relationships with Iran, North Korea and Libya from collapsing into chaos.  She also talks about her role as a crisis manager, showing that at any hour — and at a moment’s notice — she was willing to bring all parties to the bargaining table anywhere in the world.
No Higher Honor takes the reader into secret negotiating rooms where the fates of Israel, the Palestinian Authority, and Lebanon often hung in the balance, and it draws back the curtain on how frighteningly close all-out war loomed in clashes involving Pakistan-India and Russia-Georgia, and in East Africa.
Surprisingly candid in her appraisals of various Administration colleagues and the hundreds of foreign leaders with whom she dealt, Rice also offers here keen insight into how history actually proceeds.  In No Higher Honor, she delivers a master class in statecraft  — but always in a way that reveals her essential warmth and humility, and her deep reverence for the ideals on which America was founded