New Books

 

Becoming King: Martin Luther King Jr. and the Making of a National Leader (Civil Rights and the Struggle for Black Equality in the Twentieth Century) by Troy Jackson

E 185.97 .K5 J343 2008

“The history books may write it Reverend King was born in Atlanta, and then came to Montgomery, but we feel that he was born in Montgomery in the struggle here, and now he is moving to Atlanta for bigger responsibilities.” — Member of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, November 1959 Preacher — this simple term describes the twenty-five-year-old Ph.D. in theology who arrived in Montgomery, Alabama, to become the pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in 1954. His name was Martin Luther King Jr., but where did this young minister come from? What did he believe, and what role would he play in the growing activism of the civil rights movement of the 1950s? In Becoming King: Martin Luther King Jr. and the Making of a National Leader, author Troy Jackson chronicles King’s emergence and effectiveness as a civil rights leader by examining his relationship with the people of Montgomery, Alabama. Using the sharp lens of Montgomery’s struggle for racial equality to investigate King’s burgeoning leadership, Jackson explores King’s ability to connect with the educated and the unlettered, professionals and the working class. In particular, Jackson highlights King’s alliances with Jo Ann Robinson, a young English professor at Alabama State University; E. D. Nixon, a middle-aged Pullman porter and head of the local NAACP chapter; and Virginia Durr, a courageous white woman who bailed Rosa Parks out of jail after Parks refused to give up her bus seat to a white person. Jackson offers nuanced portrayals of King’s relationships with these and other civil rights leaders in the community to illustrate King’s development within the community. Drawing on countless interviews and archival sources, Jackson compares King’s sermons and religious writings before, during, and after the Montgomery bus boycott. Jackson demonstrates how King’s voice and message evolved during his time in Montgomery, reflecting the shared struggles, challenges, experiences, and hopes of the people with whom he worked. Many studies of the civil rights movement end analyses of Montgomery’s struggle with the conclusion of the bus boycott and the establishment of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Jackson surveys King’s uneasy post-boycott relations with E. D. Nixon and Rosa Parks, shedding new light on Parks’s plight in Montgomery after the boycott and revealing the internal discord that threatened the movement’s hard-won momentum. The controversies within the Montgomery Improvement Association compelled King to position himself as a national figure who could rise above the quarrels within the movement and focus on attaining its greater goals. Though the Montgomery struggle thrust King into the national spotlight, the local impact on the lives of blacks from all socioeconomic classes was minimal at the time. As the citizens of Montgomery awaited permanent change, King left the city, taking the lessons he learned there onto the national stage. In the crucible of Montgomery, Martin Luther King Jr. was transformed from an inexperienced Baptist preacher into a civil rights leader of profound national importance.

Deep Blue Home: An Intimate Ecology of Our Wild Ocean by Julia Whitty

GC 231.2 .W49 2010

At the center of Deep Blue Home—a penetrating exploration of the ocean as single vast current and of the creatures dependent on it—is Whitty’s description of the three-dimensional ocean river, far more powerful than the Nile or the Amazon, encircling the globe. It’s a watery force connected to the earth’s climate control and so to the eventual fate of the human race.

Whitty’s thirty-year career as a documentary filmmaker and diver has given her sustained access to the scientists dedicated to the study of an astonishing range of ocean life, from the physiology of “extremophile” life forms to the strategies of nesting seabirds to the ecology of “whale falls” (what happens upon the death of a behemoth).

No stranger to extreme adventure, Whitty travels the oceanside and underwater world from the Sea of Cortez to Newfoundland to Antarctica. In the Galapagos, in one of the book’s most haunting encounters, she realizes: “I am about to learn the answer to my long-standing question about what would happen to a person in the water if a whale sounded directly alongside—would she, like a person afloat beside a sinking ship, be dragged under too?”

This book provides extraordinary armchair entree to gripping adventure, cutting-edge science, and an intimate understanding of our deep blue home.

The Unmaking of Israel by Gershom Gorenberg

HD 850.5 .Z63 G67 2011

In this penetrating and provocative look at the state of contemporary Israel, acclaimed Israeli historian and journalist Gershom Gorenberg reveals how the nation’s policies are undermining its democracy and existence as a Jewish state, and explains what must be done to bring it back from the brink. Refuting shrill defenses of Israel and equally strident attacks, Gorenberg shows that the Jewish state is, in fact, unique among countries born in the postcolonial era: It began as a parliamentary democracy and has remained one. An activist judiciary has established civil rights. Despite discrimination against its Arab minority, Israel has given a political voice to everyone within its borders.

Yet shortsighted policies, unintended consequences, and the refusal to heed warnings now threaten those accomplishments. By keeping the territories it occupied in the Six-Day War, Israel has crippled its democracy and the rule of law. The unholy ties between state, settlement, and synagogue have promoted a new brand of extremism, transforming Judaism from a humanistic to a militant faith. And the religious right is rapidly gaining power within the Israeli army, with possibly catastrophic consequences.

In order to save itself, Gorenberg argues, Israel must end the occupation, separate state from religion, and create a new civil Israeli identity that can be shared by Jews and Arabs. Based on groundbreaking historical research—including documents released through the author’s Israeli Supreme Court challenge to military secrecy—and on a quarter century of experience reporting in the region, The Unmaking of Israel is a brilliant, deeply personal critique by a progressive Israeli, and a plea for realizing the nation’s potential.

America’s Water and Wastewater Crisis: The Role of Private Enterprise by Lewis D. Solomon

HD 1694 .A5 S74 2011

This book examines the role of private firms in the American water and wastewater industry. As more water infrastructure shifts from public- to private-sector control, vendors, consultants, and facilities are taking on more importance. Solomon presents an historical overview of water supply and treatment needs over time and the role of the government, including how water policy has been crafted. He argues that water scarcity is becoming a major problem due to groundwater depletion, contamination, and patterns of consumption. He also examines the impact of climate change on water availability and quality considering voluntary conservation programs and mandatory restrictions for water use.

Solomon also points to how for-profit firms can use technology to increase water supply. There are a number of options: by water reuse and desaliniation, reducing water losses due to decaying infrastructure, implementing irrigation technology, and increasing efficiency, thereby decreasing consumption. He describes what privatiation would look like in practice and reviews evidence from two case studies. Solomon proposes privatiation as a viable response to America’s water crisis, only that can address both scarcity and capital problems.

America’s Water and Wastewater Crisis presents a careful examination of how the water industry has operated in the U.S. in the past and how it may work as we move into the future.

Drowning in Oil: BP & the Reckless Pursuit of Profit by Loren C. Steffy

HD 9574 .M63 S74 2011

As night settled on April 20, 2010, a series of explosions rocked Deepwater Horizon, the immense semisubmersible drilling platform leased by British Petroleum, located 40 miles off the Louisiana coast. The ensuing inferno claimed 11 lives, and it would rage uncontained for two days, until its wreckage sank to a final resting place nearly a mile beneath the waves. On the ocean floor, the unit’s wellhead erupted. Over the next ten weeks, as repeated attempts to cap the geyser failed, an estimated 200 million gallons of oil—the equivalent of 20 Exxon Valdez spills—spewed into the Gulf of Mexico, eventually lapping up on beaches as far away as Florida.

Drowning in Oil, by award-winning Houston Chronicle business reporter and columnist Loren Steffy—considered by many to be the writer with the best access to the story—is an unprecedented and gripping narrative of this catastrophe and how BP’s winner-take-all business culture made it all but inevitable.

Through never-before-published interviews with BP executives and employees, environmental experts, and oil industry insiders, Steffy takes us behind the scenes of 100 years of BP corporate history. Beginning with the conglomerate’s early gambits in the Middle East to its recent ascent among energy titans, Steff unearths the roots of the Gulf oil spill in the unwritten bargain between oil producers and consumers, whose insatiable appetites drive the search for new supplies faster, farther, and deeper.

Beyond this, the Deepwater Horizon disaster took place after a history of cost cutting in pursuit of profits, particularly under the guidance of its two most recent ex-CEOs, John Browne and Anthony Hayward.

Exhaustively researched and documented, Drowning in Oil is the first in-depth examination of how a lack of corporate responsibility and government oversight led to the biggest offshore oil spill in U.S. history. It is an objective, no-punches-pulled account of the energy industry: its environmental impact and the intense competition among stakeholders in today’s oil markets.

This book puts all the pieces together, offering a definitive account of BP’s pursuit of outsized profits as the industrial world awakens to the grim realities of Peak Oil.

MicroMarketing: Get Big Results by Thinking and Acting Small by Greg Verdino

HF 5415 .V377 2010

In our age of information saturation, consumer attention is the scarcest commodity of all—which makes your job tougher than ever. How do you thread your messages through billions of bite-sized information snapshots to reach the right people? One thing’s for sure, you’re not going to succeed using traditional approaches. Mass marketing is dead; the next big thing is indeed very small.

microMARKETING empowers you to rethink, retool, and revitalize your marketing strategies to take full advantage of the opportunities created by the microcontent explosion. A pioneer in the world of microcontent marketing, Greg Verdino helps you create a strategy that emphasizes relationships over reach, interaction over interruption, and social networking over broadcast networks.

You’ll find the answers to today’s toughest questions:

  • How do I earn the attention of the right influencers and my core customers?
  • How do I really build my brand one blog post, one video clip, or even one tweet at a time?
  • How do I achieve massive scale when mainstream media is losing ground to consumer content creators and peer-to- peer distribution?
  • How do I strike a balance between tapping into today’s biggest marketing trends without losing sight of the little things that matter?

When one door closes, another opens. Mass marketing is no longer a viable marketing strategy and, likely, never will be again. Micromarketing, though, enables you to resonate with consumers in compelling new ways and achieve the big results that no longer seem possible with traditional approaches.

It’s time to start building your brand, finding new customers, establishing relationships, and getting real results on this exciting new frontier. microMARKETING will show you the way.

 

The Fetal Position: A Rational Approach to the Abortion Issue by Chris Meyers

 HQ 767.15 .M49 2010

The Fetal Position, examines the morality of abortion. The book provides a philosophical analysis of arguments given for the pro-life and for the pro-choice positions. The intention is not to advocate for either view, but to elevate the level of debate from slogans and rhetoric to reflective critical reasoning. Thus readers are left to decide for themselves which side makes the better case. Though it is a philosophy book, it is intended for a general audience (rhather than for professional philosophers).

Dirty South: OutKast, Lil Wayne, Soulja Boy, and the Southern Rappers Who Reinvented Hip-Hop by Ben Westhoff
ML 3521 .W47 2011
Rap music from New York and Los Angeles once ruled the charts, but nowadays the southern sound thoroughly dominates the radio, Billboard, and MTV. Coastal artists like Wu-Tang Clan, Nas, and Ice-T call southern rap “garbage,” but they’re probably just jealous, as artists like Lil Wayne and T.I. still move millions of copies, and OutKast has the bestselling rap album of all time.

In Dirty South, author Ben Westhoff investigates the southern rap phenomenon, watching rappers “make it rain” in a Houston strip club and partying with the 2 Live Crew’s Luke Campbell. Westhoff visits the gritty neighborhoods where T.I. and Lil Wayne grew up, kicks it with Big Boi in Atlanta, and speaks with artists like DJ Smurf and Ms. Peachez, dance-craze originators accused of setting back the black race fifty years. Acting both as investigative journalist and irreverent critic, Westhoff probes the celebrated-but-dark history of Houston label Rap-A-Lot Records, details the lethal rivalry between Atlanta MCs Gucci Mane and Young Jeezy, and gets venerable rapper Scarface to open up about his time in a mental institution. Dirty South features exclusive interviews with the genre’s most colorful players.

Westhoff has written a journalistic tour de force, the definitive account of the most vital musical culture of our time.

 

Droppin Science Critical Essays on Rap Music and Hip Hop Culture edited by William Eric Perkins
ML 3531 .D77 1996
Hip Hop America by Nelson George
ML 3531 .G46 2005
Now with a new introduction by the author, Hip Hop America is the definitive account of the society-altering collision between black youth culture and the mass media.

 The Oedipus Plays of Sophocles: Oedipus the King; Oedipus at Colonus; Antigone by Sophocles translated by Paul Roche

PA 4414 .A2 2004

To Laius, King of Thebes, an oracle foretold that the child born to him by his queen Jocasta would slay his father and wed his mother. So when in time a son was born the infant’s feet were riveted together and he was left to die on Mount Cithaeron. But a shepherd found the babe and tended him, and delivered him to another shepherd who took him to his master, the King or Corinth. Polybus being childless adopted the boy, who grew up believing that he was indeed the King’s son.
  Sophocles in an Hour (Playwrights in an Hour) by Carl R. Mueller                          PA 441 .M84 2009
BOOK SYNOPSIS When he was not writing tragedies, acting in his own plays, and innovating ancient Greek theater, Sophocles served as an ordained priest at a temple for the god of medicine. Thinking about the end of life, Sophocles began outlining Oedipus the King, a tragedy that examines fate, death, and the mysterious depths of the human psyche themes that he explored in all of his masterful plays.
Setting the playwright in context to his personal life, social, historical and political events, other writers of influence, and more, you will quickly gain a deep understanding of Sophocles and the plays he wrote. Read Sophocles in an Hour and experience his plays like never before. Know the playwright, love the play!

Chekhov in an Hour (Playwrights in an Hour) by Carol Rocamora                              PG 3458 .Z8 R625 2010As a schoolboy, Anton Chekhov stole into the local theater at night, dressed as his father, and marveled at the plays of Shakespeare and Moliere. Mesmerized by the characters on the stage, he went on to write his own tragicomedies: The Seagull, Uncle Vanya, The Three Sisters, and The Cherry Orchard.
Setting the playwright in context to his personal life, social, historical and political events, other writers of influence, and more, you will quickly gain a deep understanding of Chekhov and the plays he wrote. Read Chekhov in an Hour and experience his plays like never before. Know the playwright, love the play!

 

Annie Oakley’s Girl by Rebecca Brown

PS 3552 .R6973 A83 1993

 

Accidental Birds of the Carolinas by Marjoire Hudson

PS 3558 .U3116 A23 2011

Like birds blown off course, the characters in these stories need a place to roost-somewhere to settle long enough to repair their ragged hearts-and they find it near the banks of the mythical Sissipahaw River. In the centerpiece story, an eighteenth-century Eno Indian tells of the fiery fate of his adopted father, English explorer John Lawson. In the surrounding stories, the age-old conflicts between newcomer and old-timer play out as twenty-first century retirees, carnies, runaways, heartbroken women, and farmers stumble into new lives and new insights in Ambler County, North Carolina. “Hudson’s prose is pure as birdsong,” says novelist Doris Betts. “These fine stories of change and discovery are a field guide to the human species in transition.”
 Carver: A Life in Poems by Marilyn Nelson
PS 3573 .A4795 C37 2001
This collection of poems assembled by award-winning writer Marilyn Nelson provides young readers with a compelling, lyrical account of the life of revered African-American botanist and inventor George Washington Carver. Born in 1864 and raised by white slave owners, Carver left home in search of an education and eventually earned a master’s degree in agriculture. In 1896, he was invited by Booker T. Washington to head the agricultural department at the all-black-staffed Tuskegee Institute. There he conducted innovative research to find uses for crops such as cowpeas, sweet potatoes, and peanuts, while seeking solutions to the plight of landless black farmers. Through 44 poems, told from the point of view of Carver and the people who knew him, Nelson celebrates his character and accomplishments. She includes prose summaries of events and archival photographs.
Geology for Nongeologists (Science for Nonscientists)
QE 31 .S64 2009
      Geology for Nongeologists introduces basic concepts in geology: how rocks, minerals, and fossils are classified, how wind, ice, and water have shaped the earth, how mountains are formed, and how volcanoes, geysers, earthquakes, glaciers, and groundwater work to modify the physical structure of Earth.
Primarily designed as an information source, and intended to be a non-technical survey for those with little background in science, this book is presented in a reader-friendly style. Written in straightforward and accessible English, this book provides a broad look at a multidisciplinary field that incorporates aspects of biology, chemistry, physics, ecology, geography, meteorology, pedology, and many other areas of science.
This book fills the gap between general introductory science texts and advanced environmental science books. Books on the subject are typically geared toward professionals in these fields. This makes undertaking a study of geology daunting to those without a specific background in science. However, this complexity also indicates geology’s broad impact. Because geology so widely affects us, sometimes in profound ways, it is important to understand its basic concepts. This book presents information that everyone needs to know about geology and about how science and scientists work.
The author uses illustrative problems in terms of commonly used geological parameters, and each chapter ends with a chapter review test. Readers discover a new appreciation for their surroundings and a broader outlook on their environment.
 Plastic: A Toxic Love Story by Susan Freinkel
TP 1120 .F74 2011
Plastic built the modern world. Where would we be without bike helmets, baggies, toothbrushes, and pacemakers? But a century into our love affair with plastic, we’re starting to realize it’s not such a healthy relationship. Plastics draw on dwindling fossil fuels, leach harmful chemicals, litter landscapes, and destroy marine life. As journalist Susan Freinkel points out in this engaging and eye-opening book, we’re nearing a crisis point. We’ve produced as much plastic in the past decade as we did in the entire twentieth century. We’re drowning in the stuff, and we need to start making some hard choices.
Freinkel gives us the tools we need with a blend of lively anecdotes and analysis. She combs through scientific studies and economic data, reporting from China and across the United States to assess the real impact of plastic on our lives. She tells her story through eight familiar plastic objects: comb, chair, Frisbee, IV bag, disposable lighter, grocery bag, soda bottle, and credit card. Her conclusion: we cannot stay on our plastic-paved path. And we don’t have to. Plastic points the way toward a new creative partnership with the material we love to hate but can’t seem to live without.
 More Hands-On Information Literacy Activities by Fiona Hunt and Jane Birks
ZA 3075 .H86 2008    (book and CD Rom)
Authors Fiona Hunt and Jane Birks have tackled the 21st century digital information environment to bring you a new collection of library and classroom activities that support both secondary and undergraduate college students information literacy skill development. The book s 20 activities are suitable for both mainstream and ESL environments, and feature strategies to help students determine their information needs, access and evaluate information, and use and cite information ethically. Adaptable and easy-to-use exercises focus on the use of keywords, brainstorming, library orientation, search strings, evaluation of information, citation tips, and avoiding plagiarism, and a companion CDROM includes all supporting handouts, worksheets and answer keys. While today s students may be Web-savvy, they are not necessarily information literate. This book will help you teach the strategies and techniques of intelligent information use, engaging students in active, productive explorations of the library and its resources.
YOUNG ADULT
A Thousand Years of Pirates by William Gilkerson
YAdult G 535 .G54 2009
For as long as they’ve existed, pirates have conjured up visions of high-seas adventure and skullduggery, sea chases and bloody battles, dangerous coastal lairs and buried treasure. Rightly so, for ever since ships have carried valuable cargo, pirates have enraged monarchs and struck terror into the hearts of honest seamen with their willingness to risk life and limb for an undeserved share of the riches. Whether the cargo was gold or silver, spices or silks, animal or human, there have always been villains ruthless enough to kill or be hanged for it.
From the days of the Vikings to the present and in all the oceans of the world, pirates have made their presence known and feared. Recorded here are their stories along with striking images of ships, storms at sea, and secret harbors where “black ships” could be re-stocked and refitted.
Award-winning author and artist William Gilkerson has spent years researching and painting their colorful history. From the terrible Black Beard to the fascinating Granuaile, or Grace O’Malley as the English called her, they have come to life under his brush. One can almost hear the creak of timbers, the snap of canvas while turning the pages. This gift book is a rich treasure in its own right.
CHILDREN LITERATURE
 Rivers: Natures’s Busy Waterways (Earthworks (Honesdale, Pa.)) By David L. Harrison
ChildLit GB 1203.8 .H36 2002
Ages 5-8. From a trickle of raindrops and melting snow in the mountains a river is born. What happens after that? Harrison explains how trickles turn into rills, rills into streamlets, streamlets into streams that form deep channels as they grow. The text, awkwardly presented in verse, also describes how much depends on rivers: people need them, of course, as do trees, flowers, and the tiny creatures at the bottom of the complex aquatic food chain. Full-page, color illustrations with a slightly three-dimensional look show how rivers are built–dirt and pebbles grinding the banks and bottoms to make them wider and deeper and the river floor flattening as time passes. There’s also basic information on conservation and pollution–along with a clear sense of the wonder of it all. An author’s note and bibliography are appended. Shelley Townsend-Hudson

 

Do You Know Which Ones Will Grow?
ChildLit PZ 8.3 .S539 Do 2011

 

A duckling grows and becomes a duck, so can a car grow into a truck? This beguiling book about growth will sparks kids’imaginations, as gatefolds playfully transform a watch into a clock and a shovel into a plow. The interactive format of question and answer will entrance young readers as living things that grow are compared to inanimate objects that don’t. Ingenious!