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Explore Healthcare Programs

A career in healthcare is within reach through CFCC’s accredited health sciences programs.

While admission requirements and program lengths vary, similarities can be found among the programs we offer. In your quest to find the health science program that’s the best fit for you, we invite you to explore and consider your options.

Access the links below to learn more about each program and find other programs that could be a good fit for you.

Associate Degree Nursing


Cardiovascular Sonography

Diagnostic medical sonographers operate special imaging equipment to create images or conduct tests. The images and test results that diagnostic imaging workers produce help physicians assess and diagnose medical conditions.

What do they typically do:

  • Prepare and maintain diagnostic imaging equipment
  • Prepare patient for exam by explaining what to expect; transferring patient to ultrasound table; and scrubbing skin and applying gel
  • Observe and care for patients throughout examinations to ensure their safety and comfort
  • Select appropriate equipment settings and adjust patient positions to obtain the best sites and angles
  • Recognize the difference between normal and abnormal images and other diagnostic information
  • Analyze the images or test results to check for quality and adequate coverage of the areas needed for diagnoses
  • Record findings and keep track of patients’ records
  • Analyze diagnostic information to provide a summary of findings for physicians
Learn more about CFCC’s Cardiovascular Sonography program


Dental Assisting

Dental assistants have many tasks, ranging from patient care and taking x-rays to recordkeeping and scheduling appointments. Their duties vary by state and by the dentists’ offices where they work.

What do they typically do:

  • Help patients feel comfortable in the dental chair and prepare them for treatments and procedures
  • Sterilize dental instruments
  • Prepare the work area for patient treatment by setting out instruments and materials
  • Help dentists by handing them instruments and keeping patients’ mouths dry during procedures
  • Instruct patients in proper dental hygiene
  • Process x-rays and complete lab tasks, under the direction of a dentist
  • Keep records of dental treatments
  • Schedule patient appointments and work with patients on billing and payment options
Learn more about CFCC’s Dental Assisting program


Dental Hygiene

Dental hygienists clean teeth, examine patients for signs of oral diseases such as gingivitis, and provide other preventative dental care. They also educate patients on ways to improve and maintain good oral health.

What do they typically do:

  • Remove tartar, stains, and plaque from teeth
  • Apply sealants and fluorides to help protect teeth
  • Take and develop dental x-rays
  • Keep track of patient care and treatment plans
  • Teach patients oral hygiene techniques, such as how to brush and floss correctly
  • Probe and visually examine gums for sores and signs of disease
  • Chart conditions of decay and disease for diagnosis and treatment by dentist
  • Maintain dental equipment and sharpen and sterilize dental instruments
Learn more about CFCC’s Dental Hygiene program


Medical Assisting

Medical assistants complete administrative and clinical tasks in the offices of physicians, podiatrists, chiropractors, and other health practitioners. Their duties vary with the location, specialty, and size of the practice.

What do they typically do:

  • Take and record patient history and measure their vital signs
  • Prepare treatment rooms for patient examinations; show patients to rooms;and prepare patients for physician
  • Help the physician with patient examinations
  • Give patients medications or injections as directed by the physician
  • Perform routine laboratory tests and sample analyses
  • Authorize drug refills and provide prescription information to pharmacies
  • Explain treatment procedures, medications, diets, or physicians’ instructions to patients
  • Clean and sterilize instruments and dispose of contaminated supplies
Learn more about CFCC’s Medical Assisting program


Medical Office Administration

Medical records and health information technicians organize and manage health data to ensure its quality, accuracy, accessibility, and security. They code patient information for insurance reimbursement, for databases and registries, and to maintain patient medical histories.

What do they typically do:

  • Review patient records for timeliness, completeness, accuracy, and appropriateness of data
  • Organize and maintain data for clinical databases and registries
  • Track patient outcomes for quality assessment
  • Use classification software to assign clinical codes for reimbursement and data analysis
  • Electronically record data for collection, storage, analysis, retrieval, and reporting
  • Protect patients’ health information for confidentiality, authorized access for treatment, and data security
  • Assign the patient to diagnosis-related groups (DRGs), using appropriate computer software
  • Process patient admission or discharge documents
Learn more about CFCC’s Medical Office Administration program


Medical Sonography

Diagnostic medical sonographers operate special imaging equipment to create images or conduct tests. The images and test results that diagnostic imaging workers produce help physicians assess and diagnose medical conditions.

What do they typically do:

  • Prepare and maintain diagnostic imaging equipment
  • Prepare patient for exam by explaining what to expect; transferring patient to ultrasound table; and scrubbing skin and applying gel
  • Observe and care for patients throughout examinations to ensure their safety and comfort
  • Select appropriate equipment settings and adjust patient positions to obtain the best sites and angles
  • Recognize the difference between normal and abnormal images and other diagnostic information
  • Analyze the images or test results to check for quality and adequate coverage of the areas needed for diagnoses
  • Record findings and keep track of patients’ records
  • Analyze diagnostic information to provide a summary of findings for physicians
Learn more about CFCC’s Medical Sonography program


Occupational Therapy Assisting

Occupational therapy assistants help patients develop, recover, and improve the skills needed for daily living and working. Occupational therapy assistants provide patient therapy, working under the direction of occupational therapists.

What do they typically do:

  • Help patients do therapeutic activities like stretches and other exercises
  • Lead children who have developmental disabilities in play activities that promote coordination and socialization
  • Teach patients how to use special equipment
  • Record patients’ progress, report to occupational therapists, and do other administrative tasks
  • Monitor patients’ performance in therapy activities, providing encouragement
  • Aid patients in dressing and grooming themselves
  • Implement or assist occupational therapists in carrying out treatment plans designed to help clients function independently
  • Evaluate patients’ daily living skills or the capacities of clients who have physical, developmental, or emotional disabilities
Learn more about CFCC’s Medical Sonography program


Pharmacy Technology

Pharmacy technicians help licensed pharmacists dispense prescription medication to customers or health professionals.

What do they typically do:

  • Take the information needed to fill a prescription from customers or health professionals
  • Measure amounts of medication for prescriptions
  • Package and label prescriptions
  • Organize inventory and alert pharmacists to any shortages of medications or supplies
  • Accept payment for prescriptions and process insurance claims
  • Enter customer or patient information, including any prescriptions taken, into a computer system
  • Answer phone calls from customers
  • Arrange for customers to speak with pharmacists if customers have questions about medications or health matters
Learn more about CFCC’s Pharmacy Technology program


Practical Nursing

Licensed practical nurses provide basic medical care. They work under the direction of registered nurses and doctors.

What do they typically do:

  • Monitor patients’ health, for example, by checking their blood pressure
  • Administer basic patient care, including changing bandages and inserting catheters
  • Provide for patients’ basic comfort by helping them do activities such as bathing or dressing
  • Discuss the care they are providing with patients and listen to their concerns
  • Report patients’ status and concerns to registered nurses and doctors
  • Keep records on patients’ health
  • Supervise nurses’ aides or assistants
  • Evaluate how well the nursing treatment works, collaborating with other healthcare team members as needed
Learn more about CFCC’s Practical Nursing program


Veterinary Medical Technology

Veterinary technologists and technicians perform medical tests under the supervision of a licensed veterinarian to help diagnose the illnesses and injuries of animals.

What do they typically do:

  • Collect and record patients’ case histories, observing animals’ behavior and condition
  • Provide nursing care or emergency first aid to recovering or injured animals
  • Administer anesthesia to animals and monitor their responses
  • Collect laboratory samples, such as blood, urine, or tissue, for testing
  • Perform laboratory tests, such as urinalyses and blood counts
  • Take and develop x-rays
  • Prepare animals and instruments for surgery
  • Administer medications, vaccines, and treatments prescribed by a veterinarian
Learn more about CFCC’s Veterinary Medical Technology program


Radiography

Radiologic technologists take x-rays and CAT scans or put nonradioactive materials into a patient’s blood stream for diagnostic purposes. This occupation also includes technologists who specialize in other types of scanning.

What do they typically do:

  • Adjust and maintain imaging equipment
  • Prepare patients for procedures, taking a medical history and answering questions about the procedure
  • Protect the patient by shielding exposed areas that do not need to be imaged
  • Position the patient and the equipment in order to get the correct image
  • Operate the computerized equipment to take the images
  • Review and evaluate developed x-rays and other information to make sure the images are satisfactory for diagnostic purposes
  • Set up examination rooms, ensuring that all necessary equipment is ready
  • Keep accurate, detailed patient records
Learn more about CFCC’s Radiography program


Surgical Technology

Surgical technologists , also called operating room technicians, assist in surgical operations. They prepare operating rooms, arrange equipment, and help doctors during surgeries.

What do they typically do:

  • Prepare operating rooms for surgery
  • Sterilize equipment and make sure that there are adequate supplies for surgery
  • Prepare patients for surgery, such as by washing and disinfecting incision sites
  • Scrub arms and hands and assist the surgical team to scrub and put on gloves, masks, and surgical clothing
  • Help surgeons during surgery by passing them instruments and other sterile supplies
  • Maintain a proper sterile field during surgical procedures
  • Prepare, care for, and dispose of tissue specimens taken for laboratory analysis
  • Count supplies such as sponges and instruments to maintain a sterile environment
Learn more about CFCC’s Surgical Technology program


Certified Nursing Assistant

Nurse Aide Level I (NA I)

Nursing assistants provide basic patient care under the direction of nursing staff. They help patients with daily living activities and may transfer or transport patients.

What do they typically do:

  • Answer patient call signals, signal lights, bells, or intercom systems to find out what patients need
  • Turn or reposition bedridden patients
  • Physically support patients in activities, including getting out of bed, bathing, dressing, using the toilet, standing, walking, or exercising
  • Make sure patient receives appropriate diet by reviewing patients’ dietary restrictions, food allergies, and preferences
  • Measure and record food and liquid intake or urinary and fecal output, reporting changes to medical or nursing staff
  • Measure patients’ vital signs, such as blood pressure and temperature
  • Gather information from caregivers, nurses, or physicians about patient condition, treatment plans, or appropriate activities
  • Observe or examine patients to find symptoms that may need medical attention, such as bruises, open wounds, or blood in urine

Nurse Aide Level II (NA II)

After obtaining direction from a licensed nurse a NA II may perform the following tasks:

  • Oxygen Therapy – Assist licensed nurse with setting up oxygen equipment properly, accurate reading of oxygen flow rate in client room, proper placement of oxygen device on the client.
  • Sterile Technique – Assembles needed equipment and supplies creates and maintains sterile technique while performing activities directed by a licensed nurse, accurately performs corrective action when the sterile field is broken.
  • Wound Care: Sterile dressing changes for wounds over 48 hours old.
  • Suctioning – Oropharyngeal and Nasopharyngeal suctioning to remove secretions, facilitate ventilation, diagnostic testing, and infection prevention.
  • Trach Care  – Tracheostomy care on an established well-healed tracheostomy.
  • Peripheral IV Fluids – Assist licensed Nurse with: Preparing for Administration of IV Fluids, IV Fluid Monitoring, flow Rate IV Fluids, site care, and client activities, discontinuing Peripheral Intravenous Infusions. 
  • Urinary Catheterization – Urinary catheterization, catheter care, and removal of a urinary catheter for both male and female patients.
  • G-Tube Feeding – After feeding tube placement has been verified by a licensed nurse a NA II may perform intermittent or continuous Oral/Nasogastric Tube (NG), Gastrostomy, Jejunostomy, PEG tube feedings.
  • Elimination Procedure (Ostomy Care) – remove and empty stoma appliance/bag/pouch, cleanses stoma area, and reapply ostomy appliance for a Colostomy, Cecostomy, Ileostomy, or Bowel diversion stoma.
  • Blood Glucose Monitoring  – Finger stick capillary blood glucose monitoring for patients with Diabetes Mellitus.
Learn more about CFCC’s Nurse Aide program


Phlebotomy

Phlebotomists draw blood for tests, transfusions, research, or blood donations. Some of them explain their work to patients and provide assistance if patients have adverse reactions after their blood is drawn.

What do they typically do:

  • Draw blood from patients and blood donors
  • Talk with patients and donors so they are less nervous about having their blood drawn
  • Verify a patient or donor’s identity to ensure proper labeling
  • Label the drawn blood for testing or processing
  • Enter patient information into an onsite database
  • Organize and maintain medical instruments such as needles, test tubes, and blood vials
  • Dispose of blood or other biohazard fluids or tissue as required by applicable laws, standards, or policies
  • Dispose of contaminated sharps, as required by applicable laws, standards, and policies
Learn more about CFCC’s Phlebtomy program


Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) / Paramedic

Emergency medical technicians (EMTs) and paramedics care for the sick or injured in emergencies. Their quick reaction and competent care can save people’s lives. At the emergency scene, they often work with police and firefighters.

What do they typically do:

  • Respond to 911 calls to provide emergency medical assistance such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) or bandaging a wound
  • Assess a patient’s condition and decide about treatment
  • Follow guidelines learned in training or received from physicians who oversee their work
  • Use backboards and restraints to keep patients still and safe in an ambulance during transport
  • Help transfer patients to emergency department of a healthcare facility and report observations and treatment to the staff
  • Create a patient care report, documenting the medical care given to the patient
  • Replace used supplies and check or clean equipment after use
  • Administer drugs, orally or by injection, or perform intravenous procedures under a doctor’s direction
Learn more about CFCC’s Emergency Medical Technician program


Certified Healthcare Access Associate

Healthcare access services professionals are integral in providing billing, insurance, and financial services and support procedures to patients, providers, and payers through the entirety of the healthcare experience.

Learn more about CFCC’s Certified Healthcare Access Associate program


Certified Professional Coder

Medical records and health information technicians organize and manage health data to ensure its quality, accuracy, accessibility, and security. They code patient information for insurance reimbursement, for databases and registries, and to maintain patient medical histories.

What do they typically do:

  • Review patient records for timeliness, completeness, accuracy, and appropriateness of data
  • Organize and maintain data for clinical databases and registries
  • Track patient outcomes for quality assessment
  • Use classification software to assign clinical codes for reimbursement and data analysis
  • Electronically record data for collection, storage, analysis, retrieval, and reporting
  • Protect patients’ health information for confidentiality, authorized access for treatment, and data security
  • Assign the patient to diagnosis-related groups (DRGs), using appropriate computer software
  • Process patient admission or discharge documents
Learn more about CFCC’s Certified Professional Coder program



Certified Risk Adjustment Coder

A Certified Risk Adjustment Coder (CRC™) has proven by rigorous examination and experience that they know how to read a medical chart and assign the correct diagnosis (ICD-10-CM) codes for a wide variety of clinical cases and services for risk adjustment models (e.g., hierarchical condition categories (HCCs), Chronic Illness & Disability Payment System (CDPS), and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) risk adjustment).

The greater the disease burden of the patient, the higher the patient’s risk adjustment score; if the patient is healthy, the risk adjustment score is lower. A patient’s health status reflects the costs of their healthcare needs. CRCs must ensure provider documentation is up-to-par for HCC coding and that disease processes are coded accurately to follow risk adjustment models.

Learn more about CFCC’s Certified Risk Adjustment Coder courses


Certified Drug & Alcohol Counseling (NCI)

Certified Alcohol & Drug Counselors are integral in the Alcohol & Drug treatment process. Through individual and/or group therapy, those in this profession provide support, education, and guidance to persons suffering from drug, alcohol or other substance use disorder.

Learn more about CFCC’s Certified Drug & Alcohol Counseling program


Source: Occupational information taken from NCCareers.org.

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